grammatical expression: a slew of

Today’s expression comes straight from the news. Just before I logged on to my blog site, I was reading an article about president Obama, and in it they used today’s expression: “a slew of”. This basically has the same meaning as “a lot of”. For example:

I have a slew of DVDs in my apartment that I haven’t watched yet.

President Obama has had a slew of victories in his first two years in office.

There has been a slew of complaints about our new product. People really aren’t happy with it.

My son has a slew of old toys that he needs to get rid of. Do you know anyone with a young child we can give them to?

There is a slight difference between “a lot of” and “a slew of”. First of all, “a slew of” is less commonly used than “a lot of”. Therefore, when we say it, it sounds stronger than “a lot of”. Secondly, we can use “a lot of” with both countable and uncountable nouns. However, we usually use “a slew of” with countable nouns only. As you can see from my examples, all of the nouns are countable.

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