adjective: affectionate

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Today’s adjective is “affectionate”, and it is used to describe a person who shows their love for another person through physical touch or with their words. For example:

I love to hug my friends, so I’m a very affectionate person.

Were your parents very affectionate with you when you were a child?

My husband isn’t very affectionate, especially in public. He won’t even hold my hand when we’re out.

My parents are still very affectionate with each other. Even after 30 years together, they still say I love you to each other.

Generally speaking, Japanese people are not as affectionate as European people, but I have a Japanese friend who’s very affectionate.

Please be careful with the pronunciation of this word. As I’ve mentioned before, all English adjectives ending in -ate have the pronunciation of /it/. Therefore, this word is pronounced /af FEK shun it/. If you’re not sure, you can check it with The Free Dictionary. There is a pronunciation icon for every word with both British and American pronunciation. The link for that site is on my blog.

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3 Comments »

  1. Chie Said:

    I didn’t know that all English adjectives ending in -ate have the pronunciation of /it/. I think I missed your article you mentioned about that before.
    I remembered “considerate” pronounced “-it”, but I couldn’t find any other adjective with -ate. Do you know a list or something explaining about this type of adjectives?

    • Hi Chie.

      I don’t know of any lists about these words. As far as I know, they don’t have any connection in terms of meaning. All you have to remember is that the pronunciation of the -ate adjectives is /it/, but if it’s a verb, the pronunciation is /ate/.

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