adjective: hot

index

In English, the adjective “hot” has many meanings which are often used in casual conversation. Let me go over the commonly used meanings for you in today’s blog.

1. for the weather to have a high temperature. For example:

It’s really hot today. It must be at least 40 degrees!

I don’t like hot weather very much, so I don’t enjoy the summers here.

2. for an object or food to have a high temperature. For example:

Don’t touch that pot with your bare hands. It’s really hot and it could burn you.

The soup is really hot because it just came off the stove. I need some water.

3. for some food to be very spicy. For example:

Those peppers are extremely hot, so I wouldn’t eat them if I were you.

Korean food is really hot and spicy, but I love it!

4. for something or someone to be very popular at the moment. For example:

Peter Nelson is one of the hottest young actors in Hollywood now! His last two movies were very successful.

The AB-40 computer system from ABC Computers is very hot right now! Everyone wants to get one!

5. for a person to be very sexy and attractive. For example:

Look at that girl over there! She’s so hot! I’m going to go over and talk to her.

Jayne’s boyfriend is really hot! She’s such a lucky woman!

6. to experience a lot of good luck when playing a game. For example:

I’ve won $700 at the casino so far! I’m really hot tonight!

I am hot at this game today! I’ve won every game so far!

7. something that has been stolen. For example:

A guy offered to sell me a car really cheaply, but I didn’t buy it from him. I have a feeling that it’s hot.

Pawn shops probably have a lot of hot items. I think a lot of thieves steal things and then pawn them as soon as possible.

All of these meanings are commonly used, but the last one about stolen items is probably the least commonly used in everyday conversation. However, this is the type of language that we often hear in movies or on TV shows.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: