Archive for May 26, 2011

grammatical expression: at the end of the day

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This week, the grammatical expression is “at the end of the day”. We use it when we want to express what we think is the ultimate truth about a certain situation. It’s like saying, “At the end of this situation, this is the truth.” For example:

I can tell you my opinion about which school to go to but, at the end of the day, you have to make your own decision.

People get so worried about having job success but, at the end of the day, love is all that matters.

A: I don’t know who to vote for?

B: Well, at the end of the day, it doesn’t really make a difference who wins; both candidates are so similar.

I think we should get a bigger apartment. I know it’s more expensive but, at the end of the day, being comfortable is more important than money.

People often use this expression when they want to make broad statements about how they feel about a situation.

As you can see from some of my examples, we often make a statement such as “I know it’s more expensive” or “People get so worried about having job success”. After that, we put the word “but” followed by “at the end of the day”. Finally, we say what we feel is the ultimate truth of the situation.

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